The Fortune Society News Of The Week — the week of February 6, 2017

Monday, February 6, 2017

A wide-ranging collection of news and opinion from the previous week focusing on criminal justice policy, advocacy, and reform.

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Bills passed to help tenants of New York ‘three-quarter homes’

On Wednesday afternoon [February 1, 2017], the New York City Council passed, on a 47-0 vote, five bills that are intended to help tenants of three-quarter houses… get stable housing, and to curb many problems in the industry, such as interference in tenants’ medical care.

The New York Times

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Meet the formerly incarcerated trainers offering ‘prison-style boot camps’ while getting a second chance

“My mission is to hire as many formerly incarcerated people as possible to teach fitness classes,” founder Coss Marte, 31, said. “I’ve seen the struggle of coming home.”

Inside Edition

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City Comptroller blocks contract to buy body cameras for police officers

New York City’s comptroller on Friday declined to approve a $6.4 million contract for body-worn cameras for police officers, creating a new obstacle to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s already ambitious plan to outfit every patrol officer with the devices by the end of 2019.

The New York Times

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NYC Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito won’t support expanding list of crimes that could deport immigrants

“This Council is extremely proud of the work that we have done to stop needless deportations. We’re not going to succumb to any fearmongering,” Mark-Viverito said Wednesday [February 1] when asked if she’d consider expanding the list. “We’ve struck the balance of maintaining our city safe — we’ve seen the numbers on that — and also not contributing needlessly to the separation of families, or to feeding into and serving as a feeder into this broken immigration system.”

New York Daily News

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Task force aims to reduce the number of girls in detention

Nearly 600 girls age 15 or younger went to juvenile detention in New York City in 2015. Now, a group of city officials, academics and nonprofits is trying to bring that number down to zero.

The Wall Street Journal

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How ‘collateral consequences’ can still hurt after prison

Nationwide, “collateral consequences” for the formerly incarcerated—legal restrictions on whether formerly incarcerated parents can, for example, volunteer in their children’s schools, vote, or get a real estate appraiser’s license—number more than 48,000.

The Crime Report

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A better approach to violent crime

If we’re going to end mass incarceration in the U.S., it will mean figuring out better ways to prevent violent crimes and to deal with individuals who commit them.

The Wall Street Journal

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In bid to curb violence, Chicago gets some ideas from incarcerated young adults

Officials with the juvenile justice system will continue to make a coordinated effort to stem violence in Chicago, they say. They will pay close attention to the voices of the young people who are surrounded by violence every day.

NPR

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These restaurants are creating a career path for formerly incarcerated people

In 2011, [Brandon Chrostowski] founded Edwins Leadership & Restaurant Institute as a nonprofit that prepares formerly incarcerated people for a career in the hospitality industry while offering leadership and re-entry counseling. To date, the program has graduated 166 people, and over 90% are employed.

Fast Company

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A wiser generation of prosecutors 

These women and men are at the forefront of a new generation of local and state law-enforcement officials, most elected in 2015 and 2016, who are working to change the national conversation about the proper role of the prosecutor — one of the most powerful yet least understood jobs in the justice system.

The New York Times

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